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Another Duplicate For Placeholder Purposes https://prospectidcamps.com/another-duplicate-for-placeholder-purposes/ https://prospectidcamps.com/another-duplicate-for-placeholder-purposes/#respond Wed, 08 Jul 2020 18:08:04 +0000 https://hoops.pwdclass.com/?p=197 Read More]]>

First Contact with College Coaches

June 15th is a date you want to highlight in your calendar. Starting June 15th after your Sophomore year, college coaches can begin communicating with the prospective student-athlete directly. This serves as a turning point for prospects as college coaches are now afforded the opportunity to:

  • Coaches may call a recruit at any time.
  • Recruits may send and receive an unlimited number of text messages, emails and private/direct social media messages to/from coaches or athletics staff. Coaches cannot comment publicly on social media but may follow a recruit’s social media account or likehis posts.
  • Reminder: Recruits may call coaches or athletics staff as often as they want.
What is your strategy to enhance this first contact?

Do you have a plan when your cell phone rings? When you receive that opening text message? Coaches are looking for individuals that are engaging, show interest, and bring energy to the conversation. How you present yourself, is how people first view you. What do you want their first impression to be of you? Remember, first impressions last.

The #1 priority is ENGAGEMENT. Ensure that you are showcasing you are serious about your development and serious about your future as a student-athlete. Coaches are going to be drawn toward athletes who display a strong passion for their sport. You want to convey the message thatyou are fully committed to your sport, rather than it being a hobby that you are interested in.

When the coach hangs up the phone; will they have more, less or the same amount of energy as when the conversation first started? There is nothing more frustrating than being on the phone with a recruit who is providing minimal interaction. It can be a turn off if the coach feels like they are pulling teeth trying to get you to be more responsive. Are you answering their questions in a single sentence? When we interact with others, our energy either goes up or down. Your priority needs to be that you exchange positive energy, so the coach feels better once ending that phone call. Are they going to look forward to their next interaction with you? Will they be excited to share insight with their colleagues about how the conversation went? They are calling to educate you on what their university has to offer from an academic and athletic standpoint. But even more importantly they are contacting you to form a relationship. Connections will always be a two-way street, not a one-way road.

Your #2 priority is to ask questions. By asking questions, you will not only learn more insight about their program, but you will showcase your level of interest. Coaches want players who truly want to be there. They need to know that you are going to persevere when things do not go exactly as you had planned.

Ask “questions” that show you have done some research. “Coach, I saw you guys offer —- major, are any of the current players enrolled in that department?” This clearly defines to the coach that you are serious about being a student-athlete and your academic endeavors. Plus, you have asked a question that highlights you have taken it upon yourself to research the university. You care to learn about the entire experience a student-athlete can gain from being a member of their program.

“Coach, my family and I really enjoyed watching the conference tournament championship game. We were really impressed with how your guys attacked on the offensive end. What stood out most to you during that game?” Ask a question that informs them you understand the current state of the program. Simply looking up the schedule and previous seasons results can separate you from other recruits. Learn about style of play, coaching philosophies, what aspects are they looking to improve with future recruiting classes, and how they view your abilities fitting in withwhat they do. Your passion will be contagious.

Do not be afraid to ask coaches about themselves. Find out their story, their own playing career, what do they love most about their current position, their family structure, and career goals. Oftentimes, recruits only ask questions that pertain to their life and neglect to find out anything personal about the coach. It is important that you get to know the coach on a personal level to move past the player/coach transactional dynamic.

Lastly, the #3 priority is to ask for feedback. Open the pathway for these coaches to be direct andtransparent. Seek out the truth. “Coach, what are some of the components that players struggle with the most when they transition to your level? How do you guys help players move forward?”Recruiting pitches are going to be overwhelmingly positive. Get below the surface to best gauge the fit with your priority list.

The best way to standout from other conversations is to ask for specific feedback on your development. Most people only like to hear what they want rather than hearing the truth. “Coach,what areas of my game do you recommend I invest in this summer? Do you have any shooting/decision making/conditioning drills that I can add to my workouts?” Acknowledge that you understand you must grow and get better to realize your potential. A coach will not forget that conversation.
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Duplicate Post To Be Replaced Later https://prospectidcamps.com/duplicate-post-to-be-replaced-later/ https://prospectidcamps.com/duplicate-post-to-be-replaced-later/#respond Wed, 08 Jul 2020 18:07:36 +0000 https://hoops.pwdclass.com/?p=195 Read More]]>

First Contact with College Coaches

June 15th is a date you want to highlight in your calendar. Starting June 15th after your Sophomore year, college coaches can begin communicating with the prospective student-athlete directly. This serves as a turning point for prospects as college coaches are now afforded the opportunity to:

  • Coaches may call a recruit at any time.
  • Recruits may send and receive an unlimited number of text messages, emails and private/direct social media messages to/from coaches or athletics staff. Coaches cannot comment publicly on social media but may follow a recruit’s social media account or likehis posts.
  • Reminder: Recruits may call coaches or athletics staff as often as they want.
What is your strategy to enhance this first contact?

Do you have a plan when your cell phone rings? When you receive that opening text message? Coaches are looking for individuals that are engaging, show interest, and bring energy to the conversation. How you present yourself, is how people first view you. What do you want their first impression to be of you? Remember, first impressions last.

The #1 priority is ENGAGEMENT. Ensure that you are showcasing you are serious about your development and serious about your future as a student-athlete. Coaches are going to be drawn toward athletes who display a strong passion for their sport. You want to convey the message thatyou are fully committed to your sport, rather than it being a hobby that you are interested in.

When the coach hangs up the phone; will they have more, less or the same amount of energy as when the conversation first started? There is nothing more frustrating than being on the phone with a recruit who is providing minimal interaction. It can be a turn off if the coach feels like they are pulling teeth trying to get you to be more responsive. Are you answering their questions in a single sentence? When we interact with others, our energy either goes up or down. Your priority needs to be that you exchange positive energy, so the coach feels better once ending that phone call. Are they going to look forward to their next interaction with you? Will they be excited to share insight with their colleagues about how the conversation went? They are calling to educate you on what their university has to offer from an academic and athletic standpoint. But even more importantly they are contacting you to form a relationship. Connections will always be a two-way street, not a one-way road.

Your #2 priority is to ask questions. By asking questions, you will not only learn more insight about their program, but you will showcase your level of interest. Coaches want players who truly want to be there. They need to know that you are going to persevere when things do not go exactly as you had planned.

Ask “questions” that show you have done some research. “Coach, I saw you guys offer —- major, are any of the current players enrolled in that department?” This clearly defines to the coach that you are serious about being a student-athlete and your academic endeavors. Plus, you have asked a question that highlights you have taken it upon yourself to research the university. You care to learn about the entire experience a student-athlete can gain from being a member of their program.

“Coach, my family and I really enjoyed watching the conference tournament championship game. We were really impressed with how your guys attacked on the offensive end. What stood out most to you during that game?” Ask a question that informs them you understand the current state of the program. Simply looking up the schedule and previous seasons results can separate you from other recruits. Learn about style of play, coaching philosophies, what aspects are they looking to improve with future recruiting classes, and how they view your abilities fitting in withwhat they do. Your passion will be contagious.

Do not be afraid to ask coaches about themselves. Find out their story, their own playing career, what do they love most about their current position, their family structure, and career goals. Oftentimes, recruits only ask questions that pertain to their life and neglect to find out anything personal about the coach. It is important that you get to know the coach on a personal level to move past the player/coach transactional dynamic.

Lastly, the #3 priority is to ask for feedback. Open the pathway for these coaches to be direct andtransparent. Seek out the truth. “Coach, what are some of the components that players struggle with the most when they transition to your level? How do you guys help players move forward?”Recruiting pitches are going to be overwhelmingly positive. Get below the surface to best gauge the fit with your priority list.

The best way to standout from other conversations is to ask for specific feedback on your development. Most people only like to hear what they want rather than hearing the truth. “Coach,what areas of my game do you recommend I invest in this summer? Do you have any shooting/decision making/conditioning drills that I can add to my workouts?” Acknowledge that you understand you must grow and get better to realize your potential. A coach will not forget that conversation.
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The Most Overlooked Aspect of Recruiting https://prospectidcamps.com/the-most-overlooked-aspect-of-recruiting/ https://prospectidcamps.com/the-most-overlooked-aspect-of-recruiting/#respond Sat, 04 Jul 2020 18:22:03 +0000 https://hoops.pwdclass.com/?p=145 Read More]]>

The Most Overlooked Aspect of Recruiting

The biggest problem with recruiting in college baseball actually falls on the high school athletes themselves. There are a series of questions that every high school athlete needs to ask themselves when looking into what school they will be attending for the next 3-5 years. While these athletes are young, these college decisions are setting up to effect the rest of their lives. 

The most important thing in the recruiting process is understanding yourself both as a person, and as a player. Once you are able to do that, you must then look at what is the best fit for you, both as a player, and as a person. As an athlete, we all want to PLAY the sport which is why the most important thing is finding a fit for you where you will get an opportunity to do that. 

In order to find a good fit for you as a player, you must ask yourself, Do I fit into the style of baseball this school plays? Do they move players onto the next level? Is there a lot of turnover at this school? Based on the current roster when will I get a chance to make an impact on the field? All of these questions need to be answered in hopes of making the right decision for your future.

Making sure the schools style of baseball is a very important aspect in terms of being a good fit. Every school has their own brands of baseball, whether it is playing small ball and running the bases well, or playing powerball and looking for home runs and doubles to fuel their offense. On the pitching side of things, do they have power pitchers that rely on velocity, or are their pitchers more of the crafty variety. Do they value defense, or do they play guys based off of their offensive numbers. Once you look at these things, and figure out which guys are thriving in their system, you must then look at yourself as a baseball player. This is where it is important to be honest with yourself, what style do you fit into, where will you thrive. This is key to a player’s success because at all levels of baseball there is a spot for every type of player, which is why it is so important to find the right fit for you. 

The next thing a player should look at is the school’s current roster, especially at the position you are looking to play. If you are an outfielder for instance, look at the school’s outfield situation. How did those players perform, when will they graduate, are there younger guys on the bench that might be in position to play next. These are all important things to look at that way you are not signing up for a situation that will be extremely difficult to thrive in. 

Another important thing to look at is if there is a lot of turnover at the school, along with if they are moving players onto the next level. When looking at the turnover of the school, look at how many players are actually staying at the school for their whole college tenure. If you see a lot of guys are leaving the school without graduating then that should raise an automatic red flag for you. This would cause you to look further into the situation, is this school over recruiting kids, are they bringing in kids that don’t fit their style of baseball. All of these things are important to look into and might keep you from attending that school. Athletes must also look at the matriculation rate of these schools. When looking at a junior college, look at how many of their players end up moving onto schools where you want to go and where your skill sets match, whether it’s D1, D2, D3, or NAIA. When looking at 4 year schools, look at how many of their players are moving onto pro ball. As a baseball player, we all have dreams of playing at the next level, which is why we play the game. Looking at how many players these schools are moving on will show you how well these schools are developing their players and if they are getting the most out of them. 

Once you have looked at these things from the baseball perspective, it is important to look at the recruiting process from the academic side of things. While we all want to play baseball for as long as we can, baseball comes to an end at some point for everyone. This is why it is important to set yourself up for success after baseball. That starts with finding a school that is a good academic fit for you. 

Does the school have a major that you are interested in. Every school is different, which is why it is important to figure out if they have a major that interests you. College is extremely expensive, which is why it is important to pick a degree that you will want to use the rest of your life. When looking into these things you can also ask the coach questions about their academics in the school. Some good questions to ask are, How many of their players are graduating? How many players graduate on time? These questions should help you figure out where you want to be both as a player, and as a student. 

After reading this, hopefully you understand different aspects you will need to look  at when going through the recruiting process. All of these questions are very important things that need to be answered during the recruiting process. If athletes are able to go through this checklist and make sure all the boxes are checked, players will be able to find places that they will be able to thrive in. When players are able to benefit from their situations, they will be able to thrive both on the field, and in the classroom

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